Shakespeare's Big Men: Tragedy and the Problem of Resentment

By Richard van Oort

© 2016

Shakespeare’s Big Men examines five Shakespearean tragedies – Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and Coriolanus – through the lens of generative anthropology and the insights of its founder, Eric Gans. Generative anthropology’s theory of the origins of human society explains the social function of tragedy: to defer our resentment against the “big men” who dominate society by letting us first identify with the tragic protagonist and his resentment, then allowing us to repudiate the protagonist’s resentful rage and achieve theatrical catharsis.

Drawing on this hypothesis, Richard van Oort offers inspired readings of Shakespeare’s plays and their representations of desire, resentment, guilt, and evil. His analysis revives the universal spirit in Shakespearean criticism, illustrating how the plays can serve as a way to understand the ethical dilemma of resentment and discover within ourselves the nature of the human experience.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.8in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP004000

  • PUBLISHED MAY 2016

    From: $48.75

    Regular Price: $65.00

    ISBN 9781442650077
  • PUBLISHED JUN 2016

    From: $48.75

    Regular Price: $65.00

Quick Overview

Shakespeare’s Big Men examines five Shakespearean tragedies – Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and Coriolanus – through the lens of generative anthropology and the insights of its founder, Eric Gans.

Shakespeare's Big Men: Tragedy and the Problem of Resentment

By Richard van Oort

© 2016

Shakespeare’s Big Men examines five Shakespearean tragedies – Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and Coriolanus – through the lens of generative anthropology and the insights of its founder, Eric Gans. Generative anthropology’s theory of the origins of human society explains the social function of tragedy: to defer our resentment against the “big men” who dominate society by letting us first identify with the tragic protagonist and his resentment, then allowing us to repudiate the protagonist’s resentful rage and achieve theatrical catharsis.

Drawing on this hypothesis, Richard van Oort offers inspired readings of Shakespeare’s plays and their representations of desire, resentment, guilt, and evil. His analysis revives the universal spirit in Shakespearean criticism, illustrating how the plays can serve as a way to understand the ethical dilemma of resentment and discover within ourselves the nature of the human experience.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.8in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    “In Shakespeare's Big Men, Richard van Oort pioneers the application of Eric Gans's originary hypothesis to Shakespeare, offering clear, bold, and provocative readings of five tragic heroes dealing with the resentment that attends any mortal's attempt to seize or retain centrality.”


    Lars Engle, James G. Watson Professor of English, University of Tulsa

    “Shakespeare’s Big Men is an outstanding and original work of scholarship. The application of Generative Anthropology to an interpretation of five of the major plays is revelatory. The use of these ideas about the fundamental drivers of human nature, combined with an acute sensitivity to poetic, dramatic, and psychological detail, and an engaging writing style, make for a riveting commentary. Van Oort does what a serious critic hopes to do: he helps us to see and in doing so makes these great but familiar plays new again.”


    Raymond Tallis, author of 'Aping Mankind: Neuromania, Darwinitis, and the Misrepresentation of Humanity' (2011) and Professor Emeritus of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Manchester
  • Author Information

    Richard van Oort is an associate professor in the Department of English at the University of Victoria.
  • Table of contents

    Chapter 1 - Why Shakespeare and Generative Anthropology?

    Chapter 2 - The Originary Hypothesis: Hierarchy, Resentment, and Tragedy

    Chapter 3 - Brutus’s Neoclassical Irony

    Chapter 4 - Hamlet’s Filthy Imagination

    Chapter 5 - Iago Our Co-Conspirator

    Chapter 6 - Macbeth Unseamed

    Chapter 7 - Coriolanus’s Impotence

    Chapter 8 - Coda: René Girard’s Shakespeare

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