Spatial Evolution of Manufacturing: Southern Ontario 1851-1891

By James M. Gilmour

© 1972

Europeans who settled previously unpopulated and unexploited regions of the world during the 18th and 19th centuries of the world had two economic alternatives: subsistence activities or the production of primary goods for export. In general the latter prevailed and the landscape and economy were transformed. This study examines industrial growth in Southern Ontario, one of the most economically successful regions, from 1851-1891, a period when primary activities were still very important but also when today's industrial structure was clearly being shaped. Economists, geographers, and those in related fields will welcome this approach which unites regional economic growth theory, and an empirical examination of distributional and structural change in manufacturing, in a general explanation of the spatial development of manufacturing that is relevant to all export-based regions.
Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 230 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
Product Formats

SaveUP TO 9239

Book Formats

SKU# SP004986

  • PUBLISHED DEC 1972

    From: $20.96

    Regular Price: $27.95

    ISBN 9780802032959
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1972

    From: $22.46

    Regular Price: $29.95

Quick Overview

This study examines industrial growth in Southern Ontario from 1851-1891, a period when primary activities were still very important but also when today's industrial structure was clearly being shaped.

Spatial Evolution of Manufacturing: Southern Ontario 1851-1891

By James M. Gilmour

© 1972

Europeans who settled previously unpopulated and unexploited regions of the world during the 18th and 19th centuries of the world had two economic alternatives: subsistence activities or the production of primary goods for export. In general the latter prevailed and the landscape and economy were transformed. This study examines industrial growth in Southern Ontario, one of the most economically successful regions, from 1851-1891, a period when primary activities were still very important but also when today's industrial structure was clearly being shaped. Economists, geographers, and those in related fields will welcome this approach which unites regional economic growth theory, and an empirical examination of distributional and structural change in manufacturing, in a general explanation of the spatial development of manufacturing that is relevant to all export-based regions.
Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 230 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    James M. Gilmour was a Science Advisor for the Science Council of Canada, and formerly an assistant professor of Geography at McGill University.