Speaking Spirits: Ventriloquizing the Dead in Renaissance Italy

By Sherry Roush

© 2015

In classical and early modern rhetoric, to write or speak using the voice of a dead individual is known as eidolopoeia. Whether through ghost stories, journeys to another world, or dream visions, Renaissance writers frequently used this rhetorical device not only to co-opt the authority of their predecessors but in order to express partisan or politically dangerous arguments.

In Speaking Spirits, Sherry Roush presents the first systematic study of early modern Italian eidolopoeia. Expanding the study of Renaissance eidolopoeia beyond the well-known cases of the shades in Dante’s Commedia and the spirits of Boccaccio’s De casibus vivorum illustrium, Roush examines many other appearances of famous ghosts – invocations of Boccaccio by Vincenzo Bagli and Jacopo Caviceo, Girolamo Malipiero’s representation of Petrarch in Limbo, and Girolamo Benivieni’s ghostly voice of Pico della Mirandola. Through close readings of these eidolopoetic texts, she illuminates the important role that this rhetoric played in the literary, legal, and political history of Renaissance Italy.

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Product Details

  • Series: Toronto Italian Studies
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 280 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.4in x 1.0in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP004027

  • PUBLISHED MAY 2015

    From: $54.00

    Regular Price: $72.00

    ISBN 9781442650404
  • PUBLISHED MAY 2015

    From: $54.00

    Regular Price: $72.00

Quick Overview

In Speaking Spirits, Sherry Roush presents the first systematic study of early modern Italian eidolopoeia.

Speaking Spirits: Ventriloquizing the Dead in Renaissance Italy

By Sherry Roush

© 2015

In classical and early modern rhetoric, to write or speak using the voice of a dead individual is known as eidolopoeia. Whether through ghost stories, journeys to another world, or dream visions, Renaissance writers frequently used this rhetorical device not only to co-opt the authority of their predecessors but in order to express partisan or politically dangerous arguments.

In Speaking Spirits, Sherry Roush presents the first systematic study of early modern Italian eidolopoeia. Expanding the study of Renaissance eidolopoeia beyond the well-known cases of the shades in Dante’s Commedia and the spirits of Boccaccio’s De casibus vivorum illustrium, Roush examines many other appearances of famous ghosts – invocations of Boccaccio by Vincenzo Bagli and Jacopo Caviceo, Girolamo Malipiero’s representation of Petrarch in Limbo, and Girolamo Benivieni’s ghostly voice of Pico della Mirandola. Through close readings of these eidolopoetic texts, she illuminates the important role that this rhetoric played in the literary, legal, and political history of Renaissance Italy.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Toronto Italian Studies
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 280 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.4in x 1.0in x 9.3in
  • Reviews

    ‘Roush’s rich study adds much to our understanding of the dynamics of literary authority, showing how authors can simultaneously worship their forbears while exploiting their power to sometimes contrary ends.’


    George McClure
    Renaissance Quarterly vol 69:02:2016

    ‘With a wealth of material to sustain the focus of her exploration and the clarity of style in which she presents the fruit of her research, Roush’s most recent volume merits a place on the shelf of any Renaissance or Medieval Italianst’s library.’


    Carlo Anneli
    Annali D’Italianistica vol 35:2016

    “In Speaking Spirits, eidolopoeia becomes an astute way of examining several interesting aspects of Renaissance culture.”


    Armando Maggi, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, University of Chicago
  • Author Information

    Sherry Roush is an associate professor of Italian in the Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese at Pennsylvania State University.

  • Table of contents

    Introduction

    1. Rewriting the Auctor: Revising according to the Text’s Letter or Spirit?

    2. Divining Dante: Scandals of His Corpus and Corpse

    3. Genius Loci: Exile, Citizenship, and the Place of Burial

    4. Habeas Corpus, Habeas Spiritum: Some (Not-So-) Final Thoughts

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