The Raven, the Dove, and the Owl of Minerva: The Creation of Humankind in Athens and Jerusalem

By Mark Glouberman

© 2012

Through a close textual analysis and a contrastive examination of documents from both cultures, Mark Glouberman explores the biblical roots of our Western sense of self-identity and the ways in which non-philosophical Greek materials enhance our understanding of how that cultural view developed.

Glouberman illustrates how the Hebrew Scriptures advance a humanist rather than a religious view of human nature. He then shows that this same view is germinally present in non-philosophical writings of archaic and classical Greece. Finally, Glouberman argues that the philosophical style of thinking, the intellectual basis of Greece’s contribution to the West, is in fact hostile to what the Bible teaches about human nature, and that central Hellenic figures from outside the philosophical mainstream – notably Homer and Sophocles – are ‘biblical’ in orientation. Each of Glouberman’s theses lends new depth to contemporary research on the Bible as a source of material that illuminates the human condition.

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  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 368 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.5in x 1.1in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP002264

  • PUBLISHED JUL 2012

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    ISBN 9780802090676
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    Regular Price: $82.00

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  • PUBLISHED OCT 2012

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Quick Overview

This study presents a substantial revision to received ideas about the relationship between biblical and ancient Greek conceptions of human nature.

The Raven, the Dove, and the Owl of Minerva: The Creation of Humankind in Athens and Jerusalem

By Mark Glouberman

© 2012

Through a close textual analysis and a contrastive examination of documents from both cultures, Mark Glouberman explores the biblical roots of our Western sense of self-identity and the ways in which non-philosophical Greek materials enhance our understanding of how that cultural view developed.

Glouberman illustrates how the Hebrew Scriptures advance a humanist rather than a religious view of human nature. He then shows that this same view is germinally present in non-philosophical writings of archaic and classical Greece. Finally, Glouberman argues that the philosophical style of thinking, the intellectual basis of Greece’s contribution to the West, is in fact hostile to what the Bible teaches about human nature, and that central Hellenic figures from outside the philosophical mainstream – notably Homer and Sophocles – are ‘biblical’ in orientation. Each of Glouberman’s theses lends new depth to contemporary research on the Bible as a source of material that illuminates the human condition.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 368 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.5in x 1.1in x 9.3in
  • Author Information

    Mark Glouberman is an instructor in the Department of Philosophy at Kwantlen Polytechnic University.
  • Table of contents

    Preface & Acknowledgements

    Introduction: Athens and Jerusalem

    I: In Defense of Perplexity

    II: Man’s Estate

    III: An Ethical Compass

    IV: Raven’s Land

    V: The Reformation

    VI: Contemplating the Bust of Homer

    VII: Nobodies

    VIII: The Birth of Death

    IX: Becoming Political

    X: Love Stories

    XI: Life & Times

    XII: Misbehaviourism

    Conclusion: On the Carmel

    Notes

    Index

    Bibliography