The British Caribbean: From the decline of colonialism to the end of Federation

By Elisabeth M. Wallace

© 1977

During the first sixty years of the twentieth century the British West Indies were evolving, first from colonialism to self-government, and later to a short-lived federalism. These decades were years of gradual constitutional advance during times of economic distress and social unrest. This book discusses the growth of trade unions and political parties, the causes and results of the riots of the 1930s, the advent of adult suffrage, and the rise of the ill-fated West Indies Federation. The birth and death of the federation resulted from these economic and political pressures and from the diverse ideas and personalities of rival Caribbean statesmen. Yet many perceptive West Indians considered federalism the best safeguard for civil liberties, and despite the failure of the federation, West Indians still continue to seek regional cooperation. Elisabeth Wallace accurately portrays the mood of the times and does much to clear up the intricacies of modern West Indian politics. Her book is a valuable addition to the literature on the political history of the British Caribbean.

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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 288 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP006133

  • PUBLISHED DEC 1977

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Quick Overview

This book discusses the growth of trade unions and political parties, the causes and results of the riots of the 1930s, the advent of adult suffrage, and the rise of the ill-fated West Indies Federation.

The British Caribbean: From the decline of colonialism to the end of Federation

By Elisabeth M. Wallace

© 1977

During the first sixty years of the twentieth century the British West Indies were evolving, first from colonialism to self-government, and later to a short-lived federalism. These decades were years of gradual constitutional advance during times of economic distress and social unrest. This book discusses the growth of trade unions and political parties, the causes and results of the riots of the 1930s, the advent of adult suffrage, and the rise of the ill-fated West Indies Federation. The birth and death of the federation resulted from these economic and political pressures and from the diverse ideas and personalities of rival Caribbean statesmen. Yet many perceptive West Indians considered federalism the best safeguard for civil liberties, and despite the failure of the federation, West Indians still continue to seek regional cooperation. Elisabeth Wallace accurately portrays the mood of the times and does much to clear up the intricacies of modern West Indian politics. Her book is a valuable addition to the literature on the political history of the British Caribbean.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 288 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    ELISABETH WALLACE was born in the United States of Canadian parents and educated at University College, University of Toronto, Somerville College, Oxford, and Columbia University. She is a student of the political ideas and institutions of the British Commonwealth, and is at present Assistant Professor of Political Science in the Department of Political Economy, University of Toronto.

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