The Canadian Light Source: A Story of Scientific Collaboration

By G.M. Bancroft with D.D. Johnson

© 2020

The creation of the Canadian Light Source (CLS) in Saskatoon, which began operation in 2004, was the largest science project in Canada in the last fifty years. The multi-beam facility operates more than five thousand hours per year and has more than one thousand Canadian and international users from a wide range of science, medical, and engineering disciplines. This book describes the decades of intense research from many scientists to justify this project and the resulting outstanding research covering many areas of the physical, biological, medical, and agricultural sciences.

With personal accounts and frank narration, this book describes the long history leading to the CLS, beginning in Saskatoon in the 1930s. The core of the book highlights the remarkable and unselfish collaboration and cooperation of a few hundred people from Canadian and international universities, governments, and industry, showcasing how the Canadian Light Source represents pure and applied research at its finest.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 184 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP006501

  • PUBLISHED AUG 2020

    From: $48.75

    Regular Price: $65.00

    ISBN 9781487508067
  • PUBLISHED AUG 2020

    From: $48.75

    Regular Price: $65.00

Quick Overview

This book details the people and politics involved in the development of the Canadian Light Source, the benefits to be gained from such scientific collaboration and cooperation, and the scientific successes from this world-class facility.

The Canadian Light Source: A Story of Scientific Collaboration

By G.M. Bancroft with D.D. Johnson

© 2020

The creation of the Canadian Light Source (CLS) in Saskatoon, which began operation in 2004, was the largest science project in Canada in the last fifty years. The multi-beam facility operates more than five thousand hours per year and has more than one thousand Canadian and international users from a wide range of science, medical, and engineering disciplines. This book describes the decades of intense research from many scientists to justify this project and the resulting outstanding research covering many areas of the physical, biological, medical, and agricultural sciences.

With personal accounts and frank narration, this book describes the long history leading to the CLS, beginning in Saskatoon in the 1930s. The core of the book highlights the remarkable and unselfish collaboration and cooperation of a few hundred people from Canadian and international universities, governments, and industry, showcasing how the Canadian Light Source represents pure and applied research at its finest.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 184 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "This is the definitive history of the CLS's development from 1934–2001. It is the story of the collaboration and cooperation of scientists, engineers, beamline scientists, post-docs, graduate students, administrators at universities and Canadian scientific and industrial funding agencies, provincial and federal politicians, and the men and women whose hard work, foresight and commitment led to Canada's third-generation synchrotron radiation source."


    Daryl Crozier, Professor Emeritus, Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University

    "This book is a deeply personal tale of persistence and enormous commitment to the acquisition of a vitally important research infrastructure for Canada. It exposes, often with extraordinary candour, the sociology of the academic research world and, even more importantly, the challenges created by the lack of a structured process for decision-making and funding for large facilities in this country. A welcome, and relatively rare, contribution to Canadian science policy literature, this story underscores the critical importance of the work currently being led by Canada’s Chief Science Advisor to address the policy and structural gaps in ‘big science’ decision-making."


    Janet E. Halliwell, Chair, Canadian Science Policy Council
  • Author Information

    G.M. Bancroft is a professor emeritus and adjunct research professor in the Chemistry Department at Western University and former Director of the Canadian Light Source.


    D.D. Johnson is a professor emeritus in the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Saskatchewan and former Associate Vice-President (Research) University of Saskatchewan.
  • Table of contents

    List of Figures
    Acknowledgments
    List of Acronyms and Abbreviations

    1 Introduction
    2 The University of Saskatchewan: The Electron Accelerator, Technical and Engineering Expertise, 1930s–1990
    3 The University of Western Ontario: The Beamline and Experimental Expertise, 1970s–1990
    4 Formation of the Canadian Institute for Synchrotron Radiation and Competition between Western and USask, 1989–97
    5 The Creation of the Canada Foundation for Innovation
    6 My Role as Interim Director, 1999–2001
    7 The CFI: Goals, Impact, and Paul Martin
    8 The Positive Impact on USask and Canadian Science

    Appendix 1 Synchrotron Facilities and Synchrotron Science: A Brief Overview
    Appendix 2 Canadian Institute for Synchrotron Radiation: Announcement of CFI Funding, 1999
    References
    Index
    About the Authors

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