The Correspondence of Erasmus: Letters 2204-2356 (August 1529-July 1530)

Translated by Alexander Dalzell
Annotated by James M. Estes

© 2015

The letters in this volume reflect Erasmus’ anxiety about the endemic warfare in Western Europe, the advance of the Ottoman Turks into Europe, and the increasing threat of armed conflict between Catholics and Protestants in Germany. Unable and unwilling to attend the Diet of Augsburg (June–November 1530), summoned by Emperor Charles V in the attempt to mediate a religious settlement, Erasmus corresponded with those in attendance, urging them (in vain) to preserve peace at all costs.

The letters also shed light on Erasmus’ controversies with Catholic critics (Luis de Carvajal and Frans Titelmans) who accused him of Lutheran sympathies, and former friends among the Protestant reformers (Gerard Geldenhouwer and others in Strasbourg), who embarrassed him by citing him in support of their views. Because of a mysterious and debilitating illness (identified in an appendix to the volume) the twelve months covered were less productive of scholarship than was usual for Erasmus, but it did see the publication of the five-volume Froben edition of St. John Chrysostom in Latin.

Volume 16 of the Collected Works of Erasmus series.

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Product Details

  • Series: Collected Works of Erasmus
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 472 pages
  • Illustrations: 18
  • Dimensions: 7.2in x 1.4in x 10.0in
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  • PUBLISHED MAR 2015

    From: $135.00

    Regular Price: $180.00

    ISBN 9781442647497
  • PUBLISHED MAR 2015

    From: $135.00

    Regular Price: $180.00

Quick Overview

The letters in this volume reflect Erasmus’ anxiety about the endemic warfare in Western Europe, the advance of the Ottoman Turks into Europe, and the increasing threat of armed conflict between Catholics and Protestants in Germany.

The Correspondence of Erasmus: Letters 2204-2356 (August 1529-July 1530)

Translated by Alexander Dalzell
Annotated by James M. Estes

© 2015

The letters in this volume reflect Erasmus’ anxiety about the endemic warfare in Western Europe, the advance of the Ottoman Turks into Europe, and the increasing threat of armed conflict between Catholics and Protestants in Germany. Unable and unwilling to attend the Diet of Augsburg (June–November 1530), summoned by Emperor Charles V in the attempt to mediate a religious settlement, Erasmus corresponded with those in attendance, urging them (in vain) to preserve peace at all costs.

The letters also shed light on Erasmus’ controversies with Catholic critics (Luis de Carvajal and Frans Titelmans) who accused him of Lutheran sympathies, and former friends among the Protestant reformers (Gerard Geldenhouwer and others in Strasbourg), who embarrassed him by citing him in support of their views. Because of a mysterious and debilitating illness (identified in an appendix to the volume) the twelve months covered were less productive of scholarship than was usual for Erasmus, but it did see the publication of the five-volume Froben edition of St. John Chrysostom in Latin.

Volume 16 of the Collected Works of Erasmus series.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Collected Works of Erasmus
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 472 pages
  • Illustrations: 18
  • Dimensions: 7.2in x 1.4in x 10.0in
  • Reviews

    ‘The Toronto Erasmus project is a magnificent achievement, one of the scholarly triumphs of our time. The succession of fine volumes – both in quality of content and of design and production – since the edition began in 1974 has continued to fulfil the original promise of the distinguished team of editors and the equally distinguished advisory committee.’


    Lisa Jardine
    Common Knowledge

    ‘The Collected Works of Erasmus project has long since established a new standard for scholarly translation series to emulate. Not only have the English versions represented Erasmus’ writings in crisp and accessible language, but meticulous editorial scholarship has placed the author’s  thought and work in their proper intellectual contexts.’


    Jerry H. Bentley
    Renaissance Quarterly

    ‘Academic publishing does not get any better than this: durably bound, expertly annotated, beautifully translated editions of the works of one of the finest scholars in the illustrious history of the Christian Church.’


    Michael Bauman
    Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

    ‘This current volume retains the impeccable scholarship, careful attention to detail, and beautiful high-quality materials and printing that has characterized the series… A very valuable and much appreciated addition.’


    Gregory D. Dodds
    Renaissance Quarterly vol 69:02:2016
  • Author Information

    Desiderius Erasmus (c. 1466-1536), a Dutch humanist, Catholic priest, and scholar, was one of the most influential Renaissance figures. A professor of divinity and Greek, Erasmus wrote, taught, and travelled, meeting with Europe’s foremost scholars. A prolific author, Erasmus wrote on both ecclesiastic and general human interest subjects.


    James M. Estes is Professor Emeritus of History at Victoria College, University of Toronto.


    Alexander Dalzell is professor emeritus of classics at the University of Toronto (Trinity College).