The Correspondence of Wolfgang Capito: Volume 3 (1532-1536)

Translated by Erika Rummel
Annotated by Milton Kooistra

© 2015

Wolfgang Capito (1478–1541), a leading Christian Hebraist and Catholic churchman who converted to Protestantism, was a pivotal figure in the history of the Reformation. After serving as a professor of theology in Basel and adviser to the archbishop of Mainz, he moved to Strasbourg, which became, largely due to his efforts, one of the most important centres of the Reformation movement after Wittenberg.

This penultimate volume in the series is a fully annotated translation of Capito’s existing correspondence covering the years 1532–36 and culminating in the Wittenberg Concord between the Lutheran and Reformed churches. The correspondence includes Capito’s efforts, alongside those of his colleague Martin Bucer, to negotiate that compromise. Other letters deal with local, political, financial, and doctrinal questions, as well as Capito’s personal life. The letters demonstrate the importance of Capito and his colleagues in providing advice in matters concerning the churches in southern Germany and Switzerland, but also regarding the evangelicals in neighbouring France.

Milton Kooistra’s annotation provides historical context by identifying classical, patristic, and biblical quotations as well as persons and places. Continuing in the tradition of rigorous scholarship established in Volume 1 and Volume 2, this volume provides crucial details on the evolution of Capito’s thought and its contribution to the Reformation movement.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 546 pages
  • Dimensions: 7.0in x 1.5in x 10.0in
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SKU# SP004182

  • PUBLISHED NOV 2015

    From: $135.00

    Regular Price: $180.00

    ISBN 9781442637214
  • PUBLISHED NOV 2015

    From: $135.00

    Regular Price: $180.00

Quick Overview

This penultimate volume in the series is a fully annotated translation of Capito’s existing correspondence covering the years 1532–36 and culminating in the Wittenberg Concord between the Lutheran and Reformed churches.

The Correspondence of Wolfgang Capito: Volume 3 (1532-1536)

Translated by Erika Rummel
Annotated by Milton Kooistra

© 2015

Wolfgang Capito (1478–1541), a leading Christian Hebraist and Catholic churchman who converted to Protestantism, was a pivotal figure in the history of the Reformation. After serving as a professor of theology in Basel and adviser to the archbishop of Mainz, he moved to Strasbourg, which became, largely due to his efforts, one of the most important centres of the Reformation movement after Wittenberg.

This penultimate volume in the series is a fully annotated translation of Capito’s existing correspondence covering the years 1532–36 and culminating in the Wittenberg Concord between the Lutheran and Reformed churches. The correspondence includes Capito’s efforts, alongside those of his colleague Martin Bucer, to negotiate that compromise. Other letters deal with local, political, financial, and doctrinal questions, as well as Capito’s personal life. The letters demonstrate the importance of Capito and his colleagues in providing advice in matters concerning the churches in southern Germany and Switzerland, but also regarding the evangelicals in neighbouring France.

Milton Kooistra’s annotation provides historical context by identifying classical, patristic, and biblical quotations as well as persons and places. Continuing in the tradition of rigorous scholarship established in Volume 1 and Volume 2, this volume provides crucial details on the evolution of Capito’s thought and its contribution to the Reformation movement.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 546 pages
  • Dimensions: 7.0in x 1.5in x 10.0in
  • Reviews

    “A brilliant achievement ... Readers of this volume will have the pleasure of engaging with one of the keenest minds in Reformation studies.”

    ‘Erika Rummel and Milton Kooistra have done their usual excellent job of presenting smooth and lucid translations; the foot notes are concise and learned.’


    Andrew Pettegree
    The Catholic Historical Review vol 102:04:2016

    ‘Capito project provides readers a unique insight into many of the great issues of the period… With this third volume the Capito project continues to pay great dividends to historians of the reformation era.’


    Andrew A. Chib
    Sixteenth Century Journal vol 48:02:2017

    “A singular service to scholars of both humanism and the Reformation.”
    Amy Nelson Burnett
    Journal of Ecclesiastical History

    “A brilliant achievement ... Readers of this volume will have the pleasure of engaging with one of the keenest minds in Reformation studies.”
    Laurel Carrington
    Renaissance and Reformation

    “A valuable source for students of the Renaissance and the early Reformation in the German Empire. Rummel’s translations are accurate, clear, and eminently readable.”
    Charles G. Nauert
    Renaissance Quarterly

    “Meticulously researched, edited, and contexualized.”
    Wladyslaw Roczniak
    Neo-Latin News

    “Any student of the Reformation, or indeed of the sixteenth century, will find much of interest here.”
    Andrew Pettegree
    Catholic Historical Review

    "This third volume of a projected four sets Capito among his contemporaries, and does so with the degree of detail and accuracy that we associate with Toronto editorial projects … Both for its value in providing unique detail to our knowledge of Capito’s work and as a resource for the study of Reformation-era religious thought, this volume, like its two predecessors, is indispensable. We await the fourth and final volume. "


    Ralph Keen
    Renaissance Quarterly, Vol. 71, No. 2
  • Author Information

    Wolfgang Capito (1478–1541) was a leading Christian Hebraist who converted to Protestantism and became a pivotal figure in the history of the Reformation.


    Milton Kooistra is a Fellow at the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies at the University of Toronto.


    Erika Rummel is a professor emerita in the Department of History at Wilfrid Laurier University.

  • Table of contents

    Preface

    Abbreviations and Short Titles

    Letters, 1532–1536

    Table of Correspondents

    Index

By the Same Author(s)