The Death Penalty and Sex Murder in Canadian History

By Carolyn Strange

© 2021

From Confederation to the partial abolition of the death penalty a century later, defendants convicted of sexually motivated killings and sexually violent homicides in Canada were more likely than any other condemned criminals to be executed for their crimes. Despite the emergence of psychiatric expertise in criminal trials, moral disgust and anger proved more potent in courtrooms, the public mind, and the hearts of the bureaucrats and politicians responsible for determining the outcome of capital cases.

Outsiders of all types – drifters, the unemployed, the unconventional – were the first to fall within the radar of police who were pressured to catch culprits. Although the vast majority of convicted sex killers were white, Canada’s racist notions of "the Indian mind" meant that Indigenous defendants faced the presumption of guilt. Black defendants were also subjected to discriminatory treatment, including near lynchings. Even prior to Steven Truscott’s controversial death sentence for a sex murder in 1959, abolitionists expressed concern that prejudices and poverty created the prospect of wrongful convictions.

Unique in the ways it reveals the emotional drivers of capital punishment in delivering inequitable outcomes, The Death Penalty and Sex Murder in Canadian History provides a thorough overview of sex murder and the death penalty in Canada. It serves as an essential history and a richly documented cautionary tale for the present.

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Product Details

  • Series: Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 368 pages
  • Illustrations: 48
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP006539

  • AVAILABLE NOV 2020

    From: $60.00

    Regular Price: $80.00

    ISBN 9781487508371
  • AVAILABLE DEC 2020

    From: $60.00

    Regular Price: $80.00

Quick Overview

This is the first historical study to examine changing perceptions of sexual murder and the treatment of "sex killers" while the death penalty was in effect in Canada.

The Death Penalty and Sex Murder in Canadian History

By Carolyn Strange

© 2021

From Confederation to the partial abolition of the death penalty a century later, defendants convicted of sexually motivated killings and sexually violent homicides in Canada were more likely than any other condemned criminals to be executed for their crimes. Despite the emergence of psychiatric expertise in criminal trials, moral disgust and anger proved more potent in courtrooms, the public mind, and the hearts of the bureaucrats and politicians responsible for determining the outcome of capital cases.

Outsiders of all types – drifters, the unemployed, the unconventional – were the first to fall within the radar of police who were pressured to catch culprits. Although the vast majority of convicted sex killers were white, Canada’s racist notions of "the Indian mind" meant that Indigenous defendants faced the presumption of guilt. Black defendants were also subjected to discriminatory treatment, including near lynchings. Even prior to Steven Truscott’s controversial death sentence for a sex murder in 1959, abolitionists expressed concern that prejudices and poverty created the prospect of wrongful convictions.

Unique in the ways it reveals the emotional drivers of capital punishment in delivering inequitable outcomes, The Death Penalty and Sex Murder in Canadian History provides a thorough overview of sex murder and the death penalty in Canada. It serves as an essential history and a richly documented cautionary tale for the present.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 368 pages
  • Illustrations: 48
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Carolyn Strange is a professor in the School of History at the Australian National University.
  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgments

    Introduction

    1. The Politics of the Death Penalty and the Problem of Sex Murder
    2. Sex Fiends and the Death Penalty at the Turn of Canada’s Century
    3. Contesting Convictions and Questioning Culpability: Sex Murder between the Wars
    4. Sexual Psychopathy and Penal Severity in the Post-War Era
    5. Sexual Psychopathy, Insanity, and the Death Penalty under Scrutiny in the 1950s
    6. Sex Murder in the Sixties and the Demise of the Death Penalty

    Epilogue: The Problem of Sex Murder in the Shadow of Abolition

    Note on Sources and Methods

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