The Decline of Deference: Canadian Value Change in Cross National Perspective

By Neil Nevitte

© 1996

Since the 1980s Canadians have experienced turmoil on an unprecedented scale and on a variety of fronts. Constitutional battles pitted citizen against citizen and publics against leaders. Vigorous new interest groups challenged governments to respond to new issues like the environment, gay rights, and equality for women. In the face of expanding trade relations Canadians mobilized to respond to economic uncertainty, and family relations were exposed to new stresses. What explains the turmoil?

In this extraordinarily wide-ranging book, Neil Nevitte demonstrates that the changing patterns of Canadian values are connected. Changing attitudes to authority in the family are connected to changing attitudes to the work-place and to politics and they all point to one theme—the decline of deference. Canada's turmoil is not unique, nor is it a result of the "Americanization" of Canadian values. Canada, he argues, is but one stage on which the rhythms of post-industrial value change are played out.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 352 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
Product Formats

SaveUP TO 15181

Book Formats

SKU# HE000101

  • PUBLISHED AUG 1996

    From: $37.36

    Regular Price: $43.95

    ISBN 9781551110318
  • PUBLISHED AUG 1996
    From: $34.95

Quick Overview

In this extraordinarily wide-ranging book, Neil Nevitte demonstrates that the changing patterns of Canadian values are connected.

The Decline of Deference: Canadian Value Change in Cross National Perspective

By Neil Nevitte

© 1996

Since the 1980s Canadians have experienced turmoil on an unprecedented scale and on a variety of fronts. Constitutional battles pitted citizen against citizen and publics against leaders. Vigorous new interest groups challenged governments to respond to new issues like the environment, gay rights, and equality for women. In the face of expanding trade relations Canadians mobilized to respond to economic uncertainty, and family relations were exposed to new stresses. What explains the turmoil?

In this extraordinarily wide-ranging book, Neil Nevitte demonstrates that the changing patterns of Canadian values are connected. Changing attitudes to authority in the family are connected to changing attitudes to the work-place and to politics and they all point to one theme—the decline of deference. Canada's turmoil is not unique, nor is it a result of the "Americanization" of Canadian values. Canada, he argues, is but one stage on which the rhythms of post-industrial value change are played out.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 352 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    Presents an unexpected profile of Canadians: remarkably egalitarian in family life, increasingly difficult to govern politically and to manage in the workplace. Cosmopolitan and sophisticated, yes. But tolerant? Not really.


    The Globe and Mail

    The Decline of Deference is an extraordinary contribution to our understanding of Canadian politics and society. Using a number of key hypotheses to explain the changes that have taken place in our political, economic and social values, Nevitte has drawn a fascinating and powerful portrait of change in Canada-U.S. and international comparisons, and in the challenges facing democracy.


    David Taras, University of Calgary

    The Decline of Deference is an important book. It paints a fascinating portrait of changing Canadian values, with intriguing comparisons not only to the United States but to European societies as well. Neil Nevitte's data and arguments will provoke debate for years to come among scholars of Canadian society, politics, and culture.


    Ken Weaver, The Brookings Institute
  • Author Information

    Neil Nevitte is Professor of Political Science and cross-appointed as Professor at the School of Public Policy and Governance and the School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.
  • Table of contents

    Part I: Setting the Stage

    Chapter One: A Decade of Turmoil

    Interpreting Turmoil
    Canada as One Stage
    Three Perspectives on Canadian Value Change:
    1. Canada as an Advanced Industrial State
    2. Canada as a North American State
    3. Canada as an Immigrant Society

    Chapter Two: Setting the Stage

    Structural Shifts in Context
    From Structural Change to Value Change
    Public Priorities and Orientations Towards Authority
    Conclusions

    Part II: Political Value Change

    Chapter Three: A Changing Political Culture

    Interest in Politics
    Confidence in Governmental Institutions
    Confidence in Non-Governemtnal Institutions
    The Rise of Cosmopolitanism
    Conclusions

    Chapter Four: Changing Patterns of Political Participation

    The Rise of Protest Behaviour
    New Movements
    The Case of Environmentalism
    Civil Permissiveness
    Orientations Towards Change
    Challenging Public Authority
    Conclusions

    Part III: Economic Value Change

    Chapter Five: Changing Economic Cultures

    Support for the Free Market
    Why do People Live in Need
    When Jobs are Scarce
    Free Markets and Free Trade: The Case of NAFTA
    Conclusions

    Chapter Six: A Changing Work Culture

    The Work Ethic and Pride in Work
    Why do People Work?
    Elaborating Canadian-U.S. Comparisons
    Workplace Participation
    Conclusions

    Part IV: Primary Relations

    Chapter Seven: Moral Outlooks

    Shifting Religious Orientations
    Moral Permissiveness
    Tolerance
    Situation Tolerance
    Conclusions

    Chapter Eight: Family Values, Stability and Change

    The Family and Marriage
    Women and Men, Family and Work
    Parents and Children
    Connecting Authority Orientations: The Family, Work, and the Polity
    Conclusions

    Part V: Conclusions

    Chapter Nine: Patterns of Change

    Canada as an Advanced Industrial State: Perspective 1
    Canada as a North American State: Perspective 2
    Canada as an Immigrant Society: Perspective 3
    Revisiting Authority Orientations
    Authority Orientations and the Status Quo

    Appendix: World Values Survey
    Index

By the Same Author(s)

Related Titles