The Gargantuan Polity: On The Individual and the Community in the French Renaissance

Michael Randall

© 2008

Critics and scholars have long argued that the Renaissance was the period that gave rise to the modern individual. The Gargantuan Polity examines political, legal, theological, and literary texts in the late Middle Ages, to show how individuals were defined by contracts of mutual obligation, which allowed rulers to hold power due to approval of their subjects. Noting how the relationship between rulers and individuals changed with the rise of absolute monarchy, Michael Randall provides significant insight into Renaissance culture and politics by showing how individuals went from being understood in terms of their objective relations with the community to subjective beings.

By studying this evolution, he challenges the argument that subjectivity enabled modern political autonomy to come into existence, and instead argues that subjectivity might have disempowered the outwardly directed and highly political individuals of the late Middle Ages.

A profound and detailed study of one of the most drastic periods of change, The Gargantuan Polity will be of interest to scholars of French literature, the Renaissance, and intellectual history.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 432 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.1in x 9.6in
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SKU# SP002683

  • PUBLISHED NOV 2008

    From: $69.75

    Regular Price: $93.00

    ISBN 9780802098146
  • PUBLISHED NOV 2008

    From: $66.75

    Regular Price: $89.00

Quick Overview

The Gargantuan Polity examines political, legal, theological, and literary texts in the late Middle Ages, to show how individuals were defined by contracts of mutual obligation, which allowed rulers to hold power due to approval of their subjects.

The Gargantuan Polity: On The Individual and the Community in the French Renaissance

Michael Randall

© 2008

Critics and scholars have long argued that the Renaissance was the period that gave rise to the modern individual. The Gargantuan Polity examines political, legal, theological, and literary texts in the late Middle Ages, to show how individuals were defined by contracts of mutual obligation, which allowed rulers to hold power due to approval of their subjects. Noting how the relationship between rulers and individuals changed with the rise of absolute monarchy, Michael Randall provides significant insight into Renaissance culture and politics by showing how individuals went from being understood in terms of their objective relations with the community to subjective beings.

By studying this evolution, he challenges the argument that subjectivity enabled modern political autonomy to come into existence, and instead argues that subjectivity might have disempowered the outwardly directed and highly political individuals of the late Middle Ages.

A profound and detailed study of one of the most drastic periods of change, The Gargantuan Polity will be of interest to scholars of French literature, the Renaissance, and intellectual history.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 432 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.1in x 9.6in
  • Reviews

    'Anyone interested in the classical tradition in Renaissance France would find much material to interest them... The Gargantuan Polity is every welcome, especially by virtue of bringing to light neglected legal, political and religious writings and placing these within a clear and helpful argumentative framework.'
    Hugh Roberts
    International Journal of the Classical Studies, vol 17:02:2010

    The Gargantuan Polity is powerfully argued, presenting a clear and original thesis that provides a helpful corrective to the cliché of the rise of the self.’
    Hugh Roberts
    International Journal of the Classical Tradition, vol 17:02:2010
  • Author Information

    Michael Randall is an associate professor in the Department of Romance Studies at Brandeis University.

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