The Great Black Spider on Its Knock-Kneed Tripod: Reflections of Cinema in Early Twentieth-Century Italy

by Michael Syrimis

© 2012

The emergence of cinema as a predominant form of mass entertainment in the 1910s inspired intellectuals to rethink their definitions of art. The Great Black Spider on Its Knock-Kneed Tripod traces the encounter of Italy’s writers with cinema, and in doing so offers vibrant new perspectives on the country’s early twentieth-century culture.

This comparative study focuses on the immediate responses to this cultural phenomenon of three highly influential intellectuals, each with a competing aesthetic vision – Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, founder of Futurism; Gabriele D’Annunzio, leader of Italian Decadentism; and Luigi Pirandello, a father of modern European theatre and theorist of humour. Along with demonstrating how the popularization of the feature-length narrative influenced each author’s outlook and theories, Michael Syrimis unravels the extent to which cinema enforced or neutralized the ideological and aesthetic differences between them.

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Product Details

  • Series: Toronto Italian Studies
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 376 pages
  • Illustrations: 18
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.2in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP003235

  • PUBLISHED JUL 2012

    From: $73.50

    Regular Price: $98.00

    ISBN 9781442644014
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    Regular Price: $118.00

Quick Overview

The Great Black Spider on Its Knock-Kneed Tripod traces the encounter of Italy’s writers with cinema, and in doing so offers vibrant new perspectives on the country’s early twentieth-century culture.

The Great Black Spider on Its Knock-Kneed Tripod: Reflections of Cinema in Early Twentieth-Century Italy

by Michael Syrimis

© 2012

The emergence of cinema as a predominant form of mass entertainment in the 1910s inspired intellectuals to rethink their definitions of art. The Great Black Spider on Its Knock-Kneed Tripod traces the encounter of Italy’s writers with cinema, and in doing so offers vibrant new perspectives on the country’s early twentieth-century culture.

This comparative study focuses on the immediate responses to this cultural phenomenon of three highly influential intellectuals, each with a competing aesthetic vision – Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, founder of Futurism; Gabriele D’Annunzio, leader of Italian Decadentism; and Luigi Pirandello, a father of modern European theatre and theorist of humour. Along with demonstrating how the popularization of the feature-length narrative influenced each author’s outlook and theories, Michael Syrimis unravels the extent to which cinema enforced or neutralized the ideological and aesthetic differences between them.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Toronto Italian Studies
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 376 pages
  • Illustrations: 18
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.2in x 9.3in
  • Reviews

    ‘Syrimis expresses sophisticated arguments in an elegant and straightforward style. His interdisciplinary scholarship contributes significantly to Italian Studies, but will also appeal to Cinema Studies as well as scholars interested in the intersection of technology and art in Italy.’


    Michael Edwards
    Modern Language Review vol 111:01:2016
  • Author Information

    Michael Syrimis is an assistant professor in the Department of French and Italian at Tulane University.

  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgements

    Illustrations

    Abbreviations

    Introduction: Reflections of Cinema and Technology in Marinetti, D’Annunzio, and Pirandello

    1. Film Aesthetics of a Heroic Futurism
    2. An Aesthetics of War: The (Un)Problematic Screening of Vita futurista
    3. Velocita: Between Avant-Garde and Narrativity
    4. Forse che si forse che no: Technological Inflections of a Decadent Text
    5. Through a ‘Futuristic’ Lens: D’Annunzio’s Cinematic Re-Visions
    6. The Humoristic Image in Pirandello’s Si gira
    7. Cinema as Humour: The Ottre and the Superfluo

    Conclusion

    Notes

    Bibliography

    Index

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