The Hakkas of Sarawak: Sacrificial Gifts in Cold War Era Malaysia

By Kee Howe Yong

© 2013

This book tells the story of the Hakka Chinese in Sarawak, Malaysia, who were targeted as communists or communist sympathizers because of their Chinese ethnicity the 1960s and 1970s. Thousands of these rural Hakkas were relocated into “new villages” surrounded by barbed wire or detained at correction centres, where incarcerated people were understood to be “sacrificial gifts” to the war on communism and to the rule of Malaysia’s judicial-administrative regime.

The Hakkas of Sarawak looks at how these incarcerated people struggled for survival and dealt with their defeat over the course of a generation. Using methodologies of narrative theory and exchange theory, Kee Howe Yong provides a powerful account of the ongoing legacies of Cold War oppression and its impact on the lives of people who were victimized by these policies.

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Product Details

  • Series: Anthropological Horizons
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 240 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.6in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP003686

  • PUBLISHED JUL 2013

    From: $25.46

    Regular Price: $33.95

    ISBN 9781442615465
  • PUBLISHED DEC 2013

    From: $25.46

    Regular Price: $33.95

Quick Overview

This book tells the story of the Hakka Chinese in Sarawak, Malaysia, who were targeted as communists or communist sympathizers because of their Chinese ethnicity the 1960s and 1970s.

The Hakkas of Sarawak: Sacrificial Gifts in Cold War Era Malaysia

By Kee Howe Yong

© 2013

This book tells the story of the Hakka Chinese in Sarawak, Malaysia, who were targeted as communists or communist sympathizers because of their Chinese ethnicity the 1960s and 1970s. Thousands of these rural Hakkas were relocated into “new villages” surrounded by barbed wire or detained at correction centres, where incarcerated people were understood to be “sacrificial gifts” to the war on communism and to the rule of Malaysia’s judicial-administrative regime.

The Hakkas of Sarawak looks at how these incarcerated people struggled for survival and dealt with their defeat over the course of a generation. Using methodologies of narrative theory and exchange theory, Kee Howe Yong provides a powerful account of the ongoing legacies of Cold War oppression and its impact on the lives of people who were victimized by these policies.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Anthropological Horizons
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 240 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.6in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    Highly recommended. All levels.


    A. Pashia
    Choice Magazine, vol 51:06:2014

    “This book makes a significant and important contribution to the anthropology of history and collective memory. In moving prose, Kee Howe Yong provides a deeply insightful portrayal of the everyday lives of these Chinese workers and the imbrications of their memories of their communist past within their quotidian experiences of an oppressive present. No other work so sympathetically engages with the whole theme of how the memorialization of a past marked by violence and group persecution occurs in the case of contemporary Chinese in Malaysia.”
    Donald M. Nonini, Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    The Hakkas of Sarawak makes an original contribution to studies of the Cold War and memory in Southeast Asia by examining how local communities experienced the Malayan Emergency and how the repression continues to resonate in their daily lives.  Drawing on rich ethnographic material Kee Howe Yong reveals how this past continues to permeate the present of the ethnic chinese Hakka community of Sarawak, Malaysia”
    Katharine McGregor, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne
  • Author Information

    Kee Howe Yong is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at McMaster University.
  • Table of contents

    Introduction

    Chapter 1 - Overseas Chinese

    Chapter 2 - Greater Malaysian Plan

    Chapter 3 - The Sri Aman Treaty

    Chapter 4 - Any other day at the bus station

    Chapter 5 - What’s there to tell

    Chapter 6 - Virtuous subjects

    Chapter 7 - Sites of impermanence

    Chapter 8 - Facing the artefact

    Endnotes

    Bibliography

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