The Innovation Navigator: Transforming Your Organization in the Era of Digital Design and Collaborative Culture

By Tucker J. Marion and Sebastian K. Fixson

© 2018

Innovation is a top strategic priority for firms across all industries. In The Innovation Navigator, Tucker J. Marion and Sebastian K. Fixson explore four innovation archetypes or modes – "specialist," "venture," "community," and "network" – which feature prominently in the expanding innovation landscape. Specialists employ technologies to achieve entirely new solutions and superior product performance. New corporate ventures lower the barriers for employees to self-select into entrepreneurial projects, while reducing the constraints of bureaucracy. The community brings new sources of knowledge by expanding past the firm's boundaries, dramatically increasing the number of participants. The network creates partnerships and ecosystems that create innovations that could not be developed by individual companies alone.

The Innovation Navigator guides the reader in exploring and exploiting these different modes of innovation. Individual chapters provide key insights into the inherent opportunities and challenges from a number of vantage points: from the impact on organizational resources to the role of incentives. The book also provides a framework for how firms can leverage dynamic mode shifts and multimode strategies. Firms across the industrial spectrum are profiled, from new additive manufacturing companies such as Formlabs, community-based solution providers like Forth, to traditional firms exploring new modes like GE Appliances and their FirstBuild initiative. The Innovation Navigator will assist executives in building the capabilities for peak performance in this new innovation landscape.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Rotman-UTP Publishing - Business and Sustainability
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • Imprint: Rotman-UTP Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 200 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.5in x 0.8in x 9.0in
Product Formats

SaveUP TO 15182

Book Formats

SKU# SP004485

  • PUBLISHED NOV 2018

    From: $21.42

    Regular Price: $32.95

    ISBN 9781487501112
  • AVAILABLE DEC 2018

    From: $21.42

    Regular Price: $32.95

Quick Overview

Dynamics in digital technology and human culture have rapidly changed the manner in which companies innovate. The Innovation Navigator presents strategies for exploring and exploiting these new modes of innovation through the lenses of process, people, and knowledge.

The Innovation Navigator: Transforming Your Organization in the Era of Digital Design and Collaborative Culture

By Tucker J. Marion and Sebastian K. Fixson

© 2018

Innovation is a top strategic priority for firms across all industries. In The Innovation Navigator, Tucker J. Marion and Sebastian K. Fixson explore four innovation archetypes or modes – "specialist," "venture," "community," and "network" – which feature prominently in the expanding innovation landscape. Specialists employ technologies to achieve entirely new solutions and superior product performance. New corporate ventures lower the barriers for employees to self-select into entrepreneurial projects, while reducing the constraints of bureaucracy. The community brings new sources of knowledge by expanding past the firm's boundaries, dramatically increasing the number of participants. The network creates partnerships and ecosystems that create innovations that could not be developed by individual companies alone.

The Innovation Navigator guides the reader in exploring and exploiting these different modes of innovation. Individual chapters provide key insights into the inherent opportunities and challenges from a number of vantage points: from the impact on organizational resources to the role of incentives. The book also provides a framework for how firms can leverage dynamic mode shifts and multimode strategies. Firms across the industrial spectrum are profiled, from new additive manufacturing companies such as Formlabs, community-based solution providers like Forth, to traditional firms exploring new modes like GE Appliances and their FirstBuild initiative. The Innovation Navigator will assist executives in building the capabilities for peak performance in this new innovation landscape.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Rotman-UTP Publishing - Business and Sustainability
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • Imprint: Rotman-UTP Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 200 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.5in x 0.8in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "Innovation is often an ill-posed need that organizations struggle to translate into tractable goals. The Innovation Navigator provides an approachable foundation for an innovation framework with practical guidelines for customizing and putting the process into action. While Marion and Fixson provide ample examples in the digital design and manufacturing arena to elucidate their methodology, the framework is equally applicable to software development with its synergistic ecosystems for apps, cloud services, and platforms."


    Edmond Mesrobian, former Chief Technology Officer, Tesco and Expedia

    "The Innovation Navigator is both relevant and profitable to today’s business environment. The content pertains to range of industries that can benefit from the framework and applications provided, which have already provided maximum value within top companies."


    Marco Mancini, former R&D Transformation Lead, Bristol-Myers Squibb

    "With The Innovation Navigator Marion and Fixson provide a rigorous but highly practical framework to structure the wide area of corporate innovation. Their analysis and guidance helps us to make (and give) sense of and apply the many current practices and approaches in the field."


    Frank T. Piller, Vice Dean for Strategy of the School of Business & Economics, RWTH Aachen University

    "To call innovation a noun is like calling the Roman Colosseum a stadium. It’s way more than that. Innovation is a mindset. Innovation starts with empathy for the struggle humans are facing and then becoming a champion to make it better. Great innovators are trained warriors in the arena, shoulder to shoulder, fighting the good fight, relentlessly navigating life’s complexities with you, for you, never giving up until you, not them, emerge the victor. The Innovation Navigator is a playbook for innovators everywhere to up our game!"


    Robin Glasco, Chief Innovation Officer, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

    "Marion and Fixson analyze the implications of the powerful forces exerted by the digitization of design and by rich new modes of collaboration. The result is a logical framework comprised of four distinct approaches to innovation. The book presents clear prescriptions for improved practice illuminated by clear and interesting examples. The book is an essential guide to creating effective strategy in today’s rapidly evolving environment for innovation."


    Karl T. Ulrich, Vice Dean of Entrepreneurship and Innovation at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania
  • Author Information

    Tucker J. Marion is an associate professor of innovation and new product development at the D’Amore-McKim School of Business, Entrepreneurship & Innovation Group at Northeastern University


    Sebastian K. Fixson is a professor of innovation and design, Technology Operations and Information Management Division at Babson College.
  • Table of contents

    Foreword
    Introduction

    1. The Calm Waters of the Past: Managing Innovation In Organizations in the 20th Century
    2. Technological and Social Change Create the ‘Perfect Storm’ for Innovation
    3. The Four Modes of Innovation in the Digital Era
    4. The Specialist Mode
    5. The Venture Mode
    6. The Community Mode
    7. The Network Mode
    8. The Multimode Organization
    9. Conclusions and Thoughts on the Future
  • Read An Excerpt

    Introduction

    Over 30 years ago, in 1986, Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka, two Japanese management scholars, recommended that firms replace their old, sequential process with a new approach – rugby-style, passing the “ball” within the team down the field. They called it the “new new product development game.” It was a call to action for firms to reinvent their innovation process. Firms rightfully focused on cross-functional teams and Japanese-style management tools and techniques: a house of quality for everyone. This was followed by other approaches, such as quality management via Six Sigma and Black Belts, disruptive innovation, and more recently design thinking. Despite all of these important initiatives, tools, techniques, and consultants’ advice, many firms still struggle with their innovation efforts. In fact, the failure rate of new products and services remains essentially unchanged – since 1968! Depending on the study, the failure rate for newly launched products and services hovers around 40 percent. And even highly successful firms, like Ford and Apple, go through periods and cycles of reinvigorating their innovation process, then falling back with a return to bad habits. As we prepare for the third decade of the twenty-first century and what will certainly be a dynamic and challenging time for companies, we clearly need to look at the entirety of the innovation landscape and strategically think about our approach to innovation and how it can be improved – i.e., better innovations commercialized more quickly.

    The challenges facing today’s firms are unique. To use a fishing analogy, a successful commercial fishing boat can alter where and how it trolls for fish. Navigation paths, improved imaging technology, line sets, and duration can be modified to increase the catch. But environment and weather play a role in the boat’s tactical approach, and like a storm tide formed by two meteorological forces (strong winds swirling toward the center of the storm, combined with low-pressure water currents), the way we approach the innovation game has been radically reshaped by two forces in recent years. They have created an expanded innovation landscape that has led to far-reaching changes in how companies can conceive, develop, and commercialize new products and services.

    The emergence of digital design and a collaborative culture have fundamentally altered how firms, and people, approach the innovation process. In the pre–digital design era, most new product and service development was conducted by individuals and organizations holding the relevant expertise, and most collaboration either occurred inside of firms or was governed by market-based transactions between firms. Today, aided by digital design and fabrication tools on the one hand and social networking communities and collaboration/ sharing tools on the other, the “innovation landscape” is marked by new forms of participation and ownership, with new participants entering new markets and new arrangements of collective innovation. The two major forces – digital design and a collaborative culture – form a “perfect storm” that substantially expands the innovation landscape, and in this new innovation landscape four distinct regions are emerging. Each of these regions calls for its own innovation management approach (i.e., its own innovation modus operandi). Each of these innovation modes comes with different but significant ramifications for users, consumers, communities, vendors, and firms themselves. The locus of expertise is shifting from the human expert to the tools, allowing the experts to push technology frontiers outward in the traditional regions of the new innovation landscape, while enabling non-experts to participate in some activities like never before, especially in the venture and community modes. At the same time, whereas economic transactions will remain the main form of exchange in the traditional regions, they are complemented by social exchanges in the other modes, especially the community mode, with significant challenges for designing incentives and ownership regimes.

    The good news, of course, is that this creates an opportunity-rich environment for firms to innovate. The expanded landscape, and the new innovation modes that come with it, create an ecosystem where more ideas of higher quality can seed innovation funnels, where new engineering tools allow the vetting of more mature concepts earlier in the process, where new actors can help develop solutions, and where innovation networks can lower costs and barriers to entry. This means more ideas from more sources, the potential for better ideas, and ways to radically reduce the investment needed to bring them to market. The bad news is that this also creates some new demands and hurdles. Managers need frameworks for navigating and understanding how to harness the power of this new landscape. In this book we attempt to show that there are many opportunities to leverage this new landscape, but all four innovation modes exhibit their challenges. We encourage firms to explore these different modes but to do so with clear expectations and a firm grasp of the risk and reward potential.