The Liberal Party in Alberta: A History of Politics in the Province of Alberta 1905–1921

By L.G. Thomas

© 1959

Since Alberta became a province in 1905, three parties have held office. Each won a sweeping initial victory, followed by a long tenure of office during which the opposition was ineffective. Both of the first two parties then experienced virtual annihilation at the hands of a new grassroots movement.

Despite the non-party tradition which had early become established in the North-West Territories under F.W.G. Haultain, the Liberal party triumphed in the election that followed the founding of the province, and subsequently held office for sixteen years. Why was the victory so sweeping, and why did the Liberal machine eventually break down? Why was the Conservative party unable to establish an effective opposition, and why did the United Farmers of Alberta succeed in dislodging the Liberals when the Conservatives party unable to establish an effective opposition, and why did the United Farmers of Alberta succeed in dislodging the Liberals when the Conservatives had failed? Was there, in fact, a non-party tradition of government that remained alive throughout the whole period of Liberal rule? Do the traditional parties, indeed, seem to the people of the West to have any particular relevance to provincial or territorial affairs, despite apparent willingness to accept them in the federal sphere?

Professor Thomas examines these questions thoroughly in tracing the background of politics in Alberta leading up to the rise to power of the Social Credit movement in 1935. His study, based on extensive research in newspaper files and other documents, is a major contribution to Canadian historiography and political science.

This book is No. 8 in the Series, Social Credit in Alberta; Its Background and Development.

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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 244 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 0.5in x 9.1in
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SKU# SP005877

  • PUBLISHED DEC 1959

    From: $21.71

    Regular Price: $28.95

    ISBN 9781487585051
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1959

    From: $21.71

    Regular Price: $28.95

Quick Overview

Professor Thomas examines these questions thoroughly in tracing the background of politics in Alberta leading up to the rise to power of the Social Credit movement in 1935. His study, based on extensive research in newspaper files and other documents, is a major contribution to Canadian historiography and political science.

The Liberal Party in Alberta: A History of Politics in the Province of Alberta 1905–1921

By L.G. Thomas

© 1959

Since Alberta became a province in 1905, three parties have held office. Each won a sweeping initial victory, followed by a long tenure of office during which the opposition was ineffective. Both of the first two parties then experienced virtual annihilation at the hands of a new grassroots movement.

Despite the non-party tradition which had early become established in the North-West Territories under F.W.G. Haultain, the Liberal party triumphed in the election that followed the founding of the province, and subsequently held office for sixteen years. Why was the victory so sweeping, and why did the Liberal machine eventually break down? Why was the Conservative party unable to establish an effective opposition, and why did the United Farmers of Alberta succeed in dislodging the Liberals when the Conservatives party unable to establish an effective opposition, and why did the United Farmers of Alberta succeed in dislodging the Liberals when the Conservatives had failed? Was there, in fact, a non-party tradition of government that remained alive throughout the whole period of Liberal rule? Do the traditional parties, indeed, seem to the people of the West to have any particular relevance to provincial or territorial affairs, despite apparent willingness to accept them in the federal sphere?

Professor Thomas examines these questions thoroughly in tracing the background of politics in Alberta leading up to the rise to power of the Social Credit movement in 1935. His study, based on extensive research in newspaper files and other documents, is a major contribution to Canadian historiography and political science.

This book is No. 8 in the Series, Social Credit in Alberta; Its Background and Development.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 244 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 0.5in x 9.1in
  • Author Information

    L.G. THOMAS was born in Alberta; he received his B.A. and M.A. from the University of Alberta and the Ph.D. from Harvard. He served in the Royal Canadian Navy from 1939 to 1945. Since the war he has been a member of the staff of the University of Alberta, where he is now head of the Department of History. Professor Thomas has written various articles and reviews, and a book, History of the University of Alberta during the War Years, 1939-1945, published in 1948.