The Poetry of Place: Lyric, Landscape, and Ideology in Renaissance France

Louisa Mackenzie

© 2010

The sixteenth century in France was marked by religious warfare and shifting political and physical landscapes. Between 1549 and 1584, however, the Pléiade poets, including Pierre de Ronsard, Joachim Du Bellay, Rémy Belleau, and Antoine de Baïf, produced some of the most abiding and irenic depictions of rural French landscapes ever written. In The Poetry of Place, Louisa Mackenzie reveals and analyzes the cultural history of French paysage through her study of lyric poetry and its connections with landscape painting, cartography, and land use history.

In the face of destructive environmental change, lyric poets in Renaissance France often wrote about idealized physical spaces, reclaiming the altered landscape to counteract the violence and loss of the period and creating in the process what Mackenzie, following David Harvey, terms 'spaces of hope.' This unique alliance of French Renaissance studies with cultural geography and eco-criticism demonstrates that sixteenth-century poetry created a powerful sense of place which continues to inform national and regional sentiment today.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 304 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.4in x 1.0in x 9.4in
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SKU# SP003016

  • PUBLISHED APR 2011

    From: $56.25

    Regular Price: $75.00

    ISBN 9781442642393
  • PUBLISHED APR 2011

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    Regular Price: $73.00

Quick Overview

In The Poetry of Place, Louisa Mackenzie reveals and analyzes the cultural history of French paysage through her study of lyric poetry and its connections with landscape painting, cartography, and land use history.

The Poetry of Place: Lyric, Landscape, and Ideology in Renaissance France

Louisa Mackenzie

© 2010

The sixteenth century in France was marked by religious warfare and shifting political and physical landscapes. Between 1549 and 1584, however, the Pléiade poets, including Pierre de Ronsard, Joachim Du Bellay, Rémy Belleau, and Antoine de Baïf, produced some of the most abiding and irenic depictions of rural French landscapes ever written. In The Poetry of Place, Louisa Mackenzie reveals and analyzes the cultural history of French paysage through her study of lyric poetry and its connections with landscape painting, cartography, and land use history.

In the face of destructive environmental change, lyric poets in Renaissance France often wrote about idealized physical spaces, reclaiming the altered landscape to counteract the violence and loss of the period and creating in the process what Mackenzie, following David Harvey, terms 'spaces of hope.' This unique alliance of French Renaissance studies with cultural geography and eco-criticism demonstrates that sixteenth-century poetry created a powerful sense of place which continues to inform national and regional sentiment today.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 304 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.4in x 1.0in x 9.4in
  • Reviews

    ‘Louise Mackenzie has written a thoughtful and innovative book that locates at its centre the study of Lyric poetry and its engagement with place. It will appeal to all scholars interested in French Renaissance poetry and its many contexts.’
    Margaret M. McGowan
    Renaissance Quarterly; vol64:04:2011

    ‘A thought provoking contribution to our understanding of both the literature and history of early modern France… Mackenzie’s excellent book offers a sophisticated model for reading poetry in the light of social status, the socioeconomic conditions for the production of verse, political context, and poetry’s internal cultural logics.’
    Paul Cohen
    Renaissance and Reformation – Spring 2012

    ‘Mackenzie’s brilliant treatment of lyric and place in Renaissance France raises unsettling questions about poetry’s contemporary relevance…The book is a model for work shaped by history and theory and, at the same time committed to using them for our own ends.’
    Tim Conley
    Modern Language Review, vol 74:03:2013
  • Author Information

    Louisa Mackenzie is an assistant professor in the Department of French and Italian at the University of Washington.

  • Table of contents

    Introduction

    1. Place and Poetry: An Overview
    2. The Poet and the Mapmaker: Lyric and Cartographic Images of France
    3. The Poet, the Nation, and the Region: Constructing Anjou and France
    4. The Poet and the Painter: Problems of Representation
    5. The Poet and the Environment: Naturalizing Conservative Nostalgia
    6. The Poet and the Bower: Escaping History

    Conclusion

    Notes
    Bibliography
    Index

  • Prizes

    Modern Language Association Aldo & Jeanne Scaglione Prize for French & Francophone Literary Studies - Commended in 2012
  • Subjects and Courses

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