The Provincial State in Canada: Politics in the Provinces and Territories

Edited by Keith Brownsey and Michael Howlett

© 2001

One of the enduring ironies of Canadian political life is that John A. Macdonald and the other Fathers of Confederation believed the provinces would wither away, becoming little more than municipal governments providing a few insignificant services to the individuals and communities within their boundaries. However, given their constitutional jurisdiction over ever more significant policy fields, Canada's provinces and territories have become ever more powerful "states" in their own right.

This book attempts an up-to-date overview of recent Canadian provincial and territorial politics by surveying the evolution and development of the political economy of each jurisdiction. Consideration is given to the distinct institutional features of each province and territory but the emphasis throughout is on the broader canvas of internal, regional, inter-regional, and region-to-centre debates and preoccupations of provincial political life. The essays devote much attention to the various strategies undertaken by the provinces and territories to deal with contemporary challenges such as those posed by internationalization of trade, industrial restructuring, program spending cuts, privatization, and deregulation.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 494 pages
  • Dimensions: 5.9in x 1.2in x 8.8in
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SKU# HE000287

  • PUBLISHED JAN 2001

    From: $45.05

    Regular Price: $53.00

    ISBN 9781551113685

Quick Overview

"This book represents a rare achievement in the field: specialist authors illustrate their individual provinces and territories within an overall integrating theme. There are no weak links." - Rand Dyck, Laurentian University

The Provincial State in Canada: Politics in the Provinces and Territories

Edited by Keith Brownsey and Michael Howlett

© 2001

One of the enduring ironies of Canadian political life is that John A. Macdonald and the other Fathers of Confederation believed the provinces would wither away, becoming little more than municipal governments providing a few insignificant services to the individuals and communities within their boundaries. However, given their constitutional jurisdiction over ever more significant policy fields, Canada's provinces and territories have become ever more powerful "states" in their own right.

This book attempts an up-to-date overview of recent Canadian provincial and territorial politics by surveying the evolution and development of the political economy of each jurisdiction. Consideration is given to the distinct institutional features of each province and territory but the emphasis throughout is on the broader canvas of internal, regional, inter-regional, and region-to-centre debates and preoccupations of provincial political life. The essays devote much attention to the various strategies undertaken by the provinces and territories to deal with contemporary challenges such as those posed by internationalization of trade, industrial restructuring, program spending cuts, privatization, and deregulation.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 494 pages
  • Dimensions: 5.9in x 1.2in x 8.8in
  • Reviews

    This book represents a rare achievement in the field: specialist authors illuminate their individual provinces and territories within an overall integrating theme. There are no weak links.


    Rand Dyck, Laurentian University

    This rich and well-researched collection is an essential for students of provincial politics and Canadian political economy. It provides grist for comparative provincial studies by linking provincial states and their diverse societies at a time when globalization has weakened the nation-state and paradoxically enhanced the relevance of regional and sub-national governments. From various angles, this volume casts light on Canadian politics from the bottom up rather than from the top down federal centre.


    Nelson Wiseman, University of Toronto
  • Author Information

    Keith Brownsey teaches political science at Mount Royal College in Calgary. He has published extensively in the area of Canadian politics, specializing in provincial politics.



    Michael Howlett is Burnaby Mountain Chair in the Department of Political Science at Simon Fraser University and Yong Pung How Chair Professor in the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore.
  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgements

    List of Tables

    1. Introduction: The Provincial State in Canada
    Keith Brownsey and Michael Howlett

    2. Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Regime Change in Newfoundland
    Valerie A. Summers

    3. Nova Scotia: The Political Economy of Regime Change
    James Bickerton

    4. The Challenge of New Brunswick Politics
    Hugh Mellon

    5. Prince Edward Island: Politics in a Beleaguered Garden III
    David A. Milne

    6. The Beleaguered State: Qu├ębec at the End of the 1990s
    Luc Bernier

    7. Divided Province, Growing Protests: Ontario Moves Right
    Robert McDermid and Greg Albo

    8. Paradigm Shift: A Sketch of Manitoba Politics
    Alex Netherton

    9. Saskatchewan: From Entrepreneurial State to Embedded State
    Ken Rasmussen

    10. Alberta: Experiments in Governance—From Social Credit to the Klein Revolution
    Peter J. Smith

    11. British Columbia: Politics in a Post-Staples Political Economy
    Michael Howlett and Keith Brownsey

    12. The Northwest Territories: Old and New Class Politics on the Northern Frontier
    Peter Clancy

    13. Still Frontier, Always Homeland: Yukon Politics in the Year 2000
    Floyd McCormick

    14. Nunavut: Inuit Self-Determination Through a Land Claim and Public Government?
    Jack Hicks and Graham White

    15. Comparative Provincial Politics: A Review
    Christopher Dunn

    Contributors

    Index

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