The Research Compendium: Review and Abstracts of Graduate Research, 1942-1962

Edited by Margaret Avison, Albert Ross, and Florence Strakhovsky

© 1964

This book represents an important contribution by the School of Social Work at the University of Toronto. It is a record of a carefully designed plan to include a worthwhile research experience in the educational programme of every student engaged in graduate education for the profession. In the introductory essay Dr. Albert Rose explains the methods by which this educational objective has been attempted and traces the evolution of the research requirements as a valid learning experience.

The abstracts of 398 student projects provide a varied and interesting illustrative record of the students' work. These are not definitive studies but they are fertile in suggestive ideas; and the reported findings, though limited, are studded with clues for further and more intensive study in a wide range of welfare services and in different forms of social work. The result should be a valuable source of ideas for intending researches in this field both of what is known, and perhaps equally important, of how much is not known. 

The abstracts have been prepared by Margaret Avison, who has also provided an evocative introductory review. 

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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 284 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.7in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP004097

  • PUBLISHED DEC 1964

    From: $26.21

    Regular Price: $34.95

    ISBN 9781442651524
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1964

    From: $26.21

    Regular Price: $34.95

Quick Overview

This book represents an important contribution by the School of Social Work at the University of Toronto. It is a record of a carefully designed plan to include a worthwhile research experience in the educational programme of every student engaged in graduate education for the profession.

The Research Compendium: Review and Abstracts of Graduate Research, 1942-1962

Edited by Margaret Avison, Albert Ross, and Florence Strakhovsky

© 1964

This book represents an important contribution by the School of Social Work at the University of Toronto. It is a record of a carefully designed plan to include a worthwhile research experience in the educational programme of every student engaged in graduate education for the profession. In the introductory essay Dr. Albert Rose explains the methods by which this educational objective has been attempted and traces the evolution of the research requirements as a valid learning experience.

The abstracts of 398 student projects provide a varied and interesting illustrative record of the students' work. These are not definitive studies but they are fertile in suggestive ideas; and the reported findings, though limited, are studded with clues for further and more intensive study in a wide range of welfare services and in different forms of social work. The result should be a valuable source of ideas for intending researches in this field both of what is known, and perhaps equally important, of how much is not known. 

The abstracts have been prepared by Margaret Avison, who has also provided an evocative introductory review. 

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 284 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.7in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Margaret Avison (1918-2007) completed research or editorial assignments for the Canadian National Commission for UNESCO, the Royal Ontario Museum, the Canadian Association for Adult Education, and the Indian School of International Studies. She was also a poet, and her first collection, Winter Sun, received the Governor General's Award for Poetry in 1961.



    Albert Rose was a professor of Social Work and the Co-ordinator of Research, School of Social Work, University of Toronto. He is the author of Regent Park: A Study in Slum Clearance.



    Florence Strakhovsky was Research Secretary, Harry M. Cassidy Memorial Research Fund, School of Social Work, University of Toronto.

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