Wise Practices: Exploring Indigenous Economic Justice and Self-Determination

Edited by Robert Hamilton, John Borrows, Brent Mainprize, Ryan Beaton, and Joshua Ben David Nichols

© 2021

Indigenous peoples in Canada are striving for greater economic prosperity and political self-determination. Investigating specific legal, economic, and political practices, and including research from interviews with Indigenous political and business leaders, this collection seeks to provide insights grounded in lived experience. Covering such critical topics as economic justice and self-determination, and the barriers faced in pursuing each, Wise Practices sets out to understand the issues not in terms of sweeping empirical findings but rather the particular experiences of individuals and communities. The choice to focus on specific practices of law and governance is a conscious rejection of idealized theorizing about law and governance and represents an important step in the existing scholarship.

The volume offers readers a broad scope of perspectives, incorporating contemporary thought on Indigenous law and legal orders, the impact of state law on Indigenous peoples, theories and practices of economic development, and grounded practices of governances. While the authors address a range of topics, each does so in a way that sheds light on how Indigenous practices of law and governance support the social and economic development of Indigenous peoples.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 384 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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Quick Overview

This volume explores the relationship between Indigenous self-determination – specifically practices of law and governance – and Indigenous social and economic development.

Wise Practices: Exploring Indigenous Economic Justice and Self-Determination

Edited by Robert Hamilton, John Borrows, Brent Mainprize, Ryan Beaton, and Joshua Ben David Nichols

© 2021

Indigenous peoples in Canada are striving for greater economic prosperity and political self-determination. Investigating specific legal, economic, and political practices, and including research from interviews with Indigenous political and business leaders, this collection seeks to provide insights grounded in lived experience. Covering such critical topics as economic justice and self-determination, and the barriers faced in pursuing each, Wise Practices sets out to understand the issues not in terms of sweeping empirical findings but rather the particular experiences of individuals and communities. The choice to focus on specific practices of law and governance is a conscious rejection of idealized theorizing about law and governance and represents an important step in the existing scholarship.

The volume offers readers a broad scope of perspectives, incorporating contemporary thought on Indigenous law and legal orders, the impact of state law on Indigenous peoples, theories and practices of economic development, and grounded practices of governances. While the authors address a range of topics, each does so in a way that sheds light on how Indigenous practices of law and governance support the social and economic development of Indigenous peoples.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 384 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Robert Hamilton is an assistant professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Calgary.


    John Borrows is a professor and the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law at the University of Victoria.


    Brent Mainprize is a professor in the Gustavson School of Business at the University of Victoria.


    Ryan Beaton is a PhD Candidate in the Faculty of Law at the University of Victoria.


    Joshua Ben David Nichols is an assistant professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Alberta.
  • Table of contents

    Part 1: Facilitating and Framing Wise Practices
    1. Indigenous Economic Justice and Self-Determination: Wise Practices In Indigenous Law, Governance, And Leadership 
    2. A Wise Practices Approach to Indigenous Law, Governance And Leadership: Resistance Against The Imposition Of Law 
    3. Wise Practices: Toward A Paradigm of Indigenous Applied Community Economic Development Research And Facilitation 

    Part 2: The State of the Law
    4. Economic Justice in Practice 
    5. Of Spectrums and Foundations: An Investigation into The Limitations Of Aboriginal Rights. 
    6. The State Of Canadian Law on Representation and Standing In Aboriginal Rights And Title Litigation 
    7. Miyo Pim√Ętisiwin And The Politics Of Ignorance: Advancing Indigenous ‘Good Living’ Through Dismantling Our Mediated Relations 

    Part 3: Alternative in Practice
    8. Accepting Responsibility For Your Nationhood Is Worthwhile For Any Nation On Earth, Not Just Indigenous People. 
    9. Wise Practices in Indigenous Economic Development & Environmental Protection 
    10. Looking Inward, Looking Outward: Finding Solutions in Indigenous and International Law 
    11. Victory through Honour: Bridging Canadian Intellectual Property Laws and Kwakwaka’wakw Cultural Property Laws

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